Posts Tagged ‘ Diabetes meal plans ’

The Truth about Fast Foods Mythbusters for Diabetes

Although we don’t recommend people with diabetes eat at fast food restaurants, diabetics need to understand the caloric & curb value of the food we eat in fast food restaurants. Here are few tips on how to eat healthy in fast food restaurants.

1. Chicken nuggets = Protein

Chicken nuggets are a poor choice for diabetics looking to add protein to their diabetic breakfast. In fact, not only are chicken nuggets often fried and loaded with grease, but they also contain high amounts of corn starch when they are made at most fast food establishments.

Chicken Nuggets

Therefore, by eating chicken nuggets, you are overloading your system with saturated fat and you are taking in a product that your body cannot process (the body does not process corn starch, so it turns to fat.)

Instead of chicken nuggets, ask for a grilled chicken sandwich. Make sure to specify that you want grilled chicken rather than fried chicken. Remove the bread and other condiments from the sandwich and enjoy the chicken on its own.

Keep in mind that most fast food condiments, such as ketchup, are loaded with refined sugar, so avoided them and keep your blood sugar under your control.

2. Smoothies are always a healthy diabetes meal plans option

Not all smoothies are healthy. When it comes to creating a smoothie, there are a variety of recipes that restaurants follow. Some restaurants use sugar-rich powders and juices for flavor, whereas others use natural fruits and vegetables to make their smoothies vitamin-rich. Make sure that the ingredients are all natural when you order a smoothie…and that the recipe doesn’t include sugar; fruit is sweet enough.

Some restaurants give you the option of adding protein powder to your smoothie, which may help to satiate you for longer. Keep in mind that the protein powder that they use is generally dairy-based, which should be avoided by folks who are lactose intolerant. However, protein in general can help you feel fuller longer than fruit alone.

Good Salad

3. Salads are sure-fire healthy diabetic meals

Beware of the dressing and extras. Salads are generally a safe alternative to many other fast food options, such as burgers and fries. However, it is important that you are aware of what comes with the salad. For example, a simple pack of salad dressing can add up to 400 calories and countless grams of fat to what would otherwise be healthy meals for diabetics.

Also, be careful about eating the “extras” that may come with your salad, such as croutons. Croutons are basically thickly-buttered pieces of bread that are baked until they harden. What might seem like a little bite of something crunchy can add up to be several pieces of buttered bread in no time?

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Reading Nutrition labels: Tips for people with diabetes

Mastering Nutrition Labels

Nutrition labels are one tool a person with Diabetes, or some-one trying to prevent the onset of Type 2 Diabetes, can use to make healthy food choices. To bring more balance to the diabetic meals prepared at home or how you purchase your delivered prepared meals and snacks, you can gain a lot of help from the food nutrition labels on most packaging.

Read the nutrition labels as you shop and pay attention to food serving size and servings per container. Compare the total calories in similar products and choose the lowest calorie items. Let us try to break it down and make using the food nutrition label more easily understood and a constant part of our shopping experience.

Nutrition Facts:
Nutrition FactsThe serving size is the amount of food in one serving or one portion. It is important to note that all of the information on the food label is for one serving. The portion a person eats may not be the same as the serving size listed on the label. If it is not, you will need to adjust the numbers accordingly (up or down) to make them more relevant.

Here are some tips to help you visualize government-recommended serving / portion sizes:

• 3 oz meat or poultry = a deck of cards
• 3 oz fish = a checkbook
• 1 oz cheese = 4 stacked dice or 2 slices
• 1/2 cup pasta or vegetables = ½ baseball
• ¼ cup of dried fruit = a golf ball
• 1 teaspoon butter or margarine = the tip of your thumb
• 2 tablespoons of mayonnaise, oil or dip = a ping-pong ball

The number of servings is listed next to the Servings per Container on the food label. Most food packages contain more than one serving.

Calories are a measure of how much energy a food provides a person. The food label shows the number of total calories and how many calories come from fat for one serving.

Here are some nutrition guidelines to pay attention to:

Total Fat – one fat serving is about 5 grams (g). Most people need about 50-65 grams (g) of fat a day. One teaspoon of butter or oil has about 5 grams (g) of fat. Limit saturated fat to less than 7% of your total daily calories. Eliminate/minimize foods with Trans fat from your diet, studies have shown that Trans fat can raise LDL (lousy or bad cholesterol) which is associated with heart disease.Some examples of foods with Trans fat include vegetable shortenings (lard), stick margarine, commercially baked foods, such as pastries, donuts, cookies and deep fried foods and snacks.Servings per Container

Cholesterol – A low-cholesterol food has 20 milligrams (mg) or less of cholesterol per serving. Try to eat less than 300 mg of cholesterol each day. Less than 200 mg is recommended for people with diabetes or high cholesterol. A “quarter pound” hamburger has about 70 mg of cholesterol.

Fiber – Choose foods that have 3 or more grams (g) of fiber per serving. Most people need about 25 – 35 g of fiber each day.

Sodium – Choose foods that have less than 400 milligrams (mg) of sodium per serving. Most people need 2,400 mg or less of sodium each day. One teaspoon of salt has 2300 mg of sodium.

Total Diabetes Carbohydrates – includes dietary fiber, sugar and sugar alcohols. A carbohydrate serving is about 15 grams (g). Most people need about 300 g of carbohydrate each day. Get your carbohydrates from fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and low-fat milk. A slice of store bought bread (1 ounce) has about 15 grams (g) of carbohydrate.

Protein – Most people need about 50 – 80 grams (g) of protein each day. Try to eat 2 or more servings of fish each week (not fried). One ounce of meat has about 7 grams (g) of protein.Nutrients are things we get from food

Ingredients are the things that make up the food. Ingredients are listed on food labels in the order of their amount in the food from the greatest to the least. For example, if water is the first ingredient listed, there is more water in that food than anything else. The next ingredient is listed is the thing that is in the food the next greatest amount. The last ingredient listed is the thing that is in the food the least.

Reading health claims on the label such as “fat free” or “reduced fat” can also add to the confusion of interpreting labels. Know that all claims must meet the nutrient criteria set by the government. These claims can be used in addition to the information above to make your final decisions.

Truth is, if you follow the above guidelines, you do not need these claims to help you. These are primarily marketing words to give you a quick sound bite about the product; it provides “short hand speak”. We recommend always going through the label facts and then you will not need to rely on the sound bites for your healthy eating choices like healthy snacks for diabetics and diabetic diet and meal plans. Become an expert at reading the labels and making your own decisions.

Fruits in a MarketDiabetes diet plan

Fresh fruit and vegetables are the most obvious categories where the label mostly does not exist. Sometimes if the product is pre-packaged you might find a label.

The good news is that it is hard to go wrong with fresh fruits and vegetables. The biggest loss is in understanding what a recommended food for diabetes is. I sometimes eat too much fruit and for a diabetic it is important to keep track of the sugar contribution of these fresh foods. However, for every other food that is purchased to eat from the supermarket, stop, stare at the food label and start at the top.

What is the serving size?

How many servings in this package (and so on)?

Compare it to other brands and use the above guidelines and make your decision. After some practice, this will become second nature and you will do it automatically (embarrassingly, even at other people’s houses!). So use the food label to:

• learn how much of a food is a serving (portion)
• learn what is in the food
• choose food and drinks that best fit your diabetes meal plans

A registered dietitian can also help you learn how to use diabetes diet plan labels as well as a certified diabetes educator. Just remember, nutrition food labels are your friend.

Typefreediabetes offers a full line of diabetes products, including; supplements for diabetes, durable diabetes medical equipment, and automatic blood pressure monitor and facts about diabetes. Typefreediabetes offers quality products at discounted prices on a wide selection of quality name brand equipment and supplies.

Portion Control – The Right Amount of Food

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Americans with Type 2 diabetes eat too much food and exercise too little. Studies indicate that diabetic Americans not only eat too much food, but we have a poor picture of the right amount of food. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there are specific portions of certain food groups that everyone needs to eat every day in order to stay healthy.

Portion control is understands how much a serving size is and how many calories a serving contains. Portion control is important for weight management as the weight is defined by the total calorie intake. Healthy diabetes meal plans, using Aristotle’s philosophy, is the desirable middle between the extremes of excess and deficiency (over-eating and not eating enough), the “golden mean.” Portion control is eating a healthy diabetic diet meals balance of amount and types, of varied foods.

If you’re overeating, you’re not the only one – and you may be able to point at least a portion of your finger at the restaurant industry, which commonly serves two, three, and four times the recommended portion of food per meal.

Not sure whether or not you’re eating more than the correct portion? The FDA recommends an average of 2700 calories per day for men and 2000 calories per day for a mildly active male and female respectively.

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” So when you are about to devour the content of that large plate consider that a 180 pound person burns an average of 100 calories per mile from walking by wearing diabetic shoes. That person has to burn 3,500 calories to lose one pound of fat. Calories can add up – rapidly. DO THE MATH! OK 35 miles!

Here’s a brief analysis of recommended portions for commonly over-eaten foods:

* Cheeseburger or Hamburger

The recommended portion for a burger is only 3 ounces, which packs in a light 261 calories and 12 grams of fat. However, the average burger is 7 ounces, which adds more than 600 calories and almost 30 grams of fat to your daily diabetic diet plan.

* Beer and Wine

The FDA recommends that each portion of beer be only 12 ounces (about the size of a can of beer). However, a draft beer may be around 15 ounces. The 12 ounce portion adds only 153 calories to your diet while the larger beer adds 195 calories. the good news, however, is that beer does not contain fat. Yet, it may contain carbohydrates (around 12 grams in 12 ounces.)

As for wine, you won’t receive any grams of fat, but you can save about 50 calories by sticking to the recommended 5 ounce portion (which is only 120 calories). The average glass of wine packs on 168 calories and is served at 7 ounces.

* Ice Cream

Everyone is entitled to a little sweet treat every now and then, right? Well, be sure to emphasize the “little” when it comes to the cold stuff. The average serving size for a cone or cup of ice cream is one cup. However, it’s recommended that you only consume half a cup of ice cream or low fat desserts in one sitting. Half a cup packs on 137 calories and about 7 grams of fat.

* Pancakes

Who doesn’t enjoy a leisurely brunch or breakfast that includes a tall stack? Well, if you’re trying to maintain or lose weight, then you’d better go for diabetic breakfast that includes short stack – the way short stack. The average restaurant serves four pancakes per order. However, the recommended portion is only two. Two pancakes still pack on a healthy amount of diabetes carbohydrates (around 48 grams) and may cost you about 172 calories. Better yet – go for whole wheat pancakes that will reduce the glucose spike in your blood stream.

* Bagel

Next time you order a bagel to go, make sure that you only take about half of the bagel with you at a time. The average serving for a bagel is five inches across. However, it’s recommended that you only eat a three-inch bagel if you’re trying to lose or maintain your weight by checking through body fat scales. Cutting your bagel in half may save you about 200 calories.

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Core Principles of Diet and Nutrition!

The core principles of proper Diabetes nutrition are centered on reducing blood sugar levels and increasing healthy vitamins and minerals in the diet. Diabetics, especially, should adhere to the principles of the Diabetes Food Pyramid in order to ensure that they have balanced diabetes nutrition to keep their bodies healthy.

However, unlike the general population, diabetics are not always able to process glucose at the cellular level. That is why, it is important for diabetics to understand the chemical reactions that take place in their bodies as they eat food. Understanding the biology of Diabetes is the first step in taking control of your diabetes treatment so that you can live a healthy Diabetics life. Living with diabetes can be a challenge, but these tasty diabetes diet recipes make it easier, and the whole family can enjoy them as well.

Many Diabetics feel overwhelmed when they are first diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, Type 1 diabetes, or Gestational Diabetes. Properly managed diabetes, will required you to make some basic lifestyle changes, especially in the way that you approach food. You will definitely need to limit your sugar/carbohydrates in-take.

For example, love pasta? Yes you can still have this food that you love. Only now, a better choice is whole wheat diet portion control platepasta instead of the traditional styles of pasta. Also, you need to limit your food serving sizes with diet portion control plate (one serving = 1/2cup cooked or ½ baseball) instead of all you can eat. Generally, for all the foods that you love, there is an acceptable alternative that makes you happy and your blood glucose levels also.

Know that these diabetes life style changes are entirely manageable and will make you healthier and happier as you begin to incorporate them into your regular eating habits. You can feel comfort knowing that millions of diabetics have had to make simple changes to their nutrition plans. To help Diabetics enjoy healthier food choices, many diabetes organizations have developed tips, diabetes meal plans, food, and healthy eating guidelines. Use our interactive learning module on Sugars and Starches to learn more.

Diabetes Healthy Eating Guidelines and Diabetes menu planner

Diabetes is a disease that is directly related to your sugar intake and corresponding blood sugar level. Due to the nature of diabetes, the body cannot process sugars the way that it should.

Therefore, in order to keep your blood sugar level as low as possible, it is important to limit the amount of sugar/carbs that you eat and take all medications prescribed by your doctor.

Remember that a starch unit can made up of thousands of glucose units.

Tips for limiting your sugar intake:

  • Choose whole grain products over products with refined flour.
  • Avoid eating sweets, such as desserts and candy.
  • Monitor your blood sugar level closely to avoid hypoglycemia (hahy-poh-glahy-see-mee-uh) low blood sugar or hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar levels.)
  • Avoid drinking sodas and other sugary beverages. Choose water instead.diet portion control plate
  • Limit intake of fruit juice, choose fresh fruit instead.
  • Follow the food guide pyramid and Mediterranean food pyramid.
  • Eat regular meals; no skipping!
  • Control your healthy portions sizes.
  • Choose vegetables and fruit over carbohydrates.
  • Limit dining out at restaurants that do not offer healthy choices.
  • Limit snacking especially if trying to lose weight.

Proper nutrition, diabetes vitamins, coupled with diabetes exercise and Diabetes medication, will help you manage your diabetes so that you can stay healthy longer. Take a moment to browse through this section for more information about health dining out, cooking at home with these recipes for diabetics, maintaining a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle and more.

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